About Shoe Widths

I’ve been getting a ton of questions about the meaning of certain terms used to describe the width of a shoe. I thought I should write up a quick post to explain the meaning of each term. Knowledge is power so here we go!

Shoe manufacturers have standardized rules for how to measure length but shoe width measurements are much more variable. There is some general agreement that a shoe increases 3/16th of an inch around the circumference of the ball of the foot for every increase in width for the same length. But different manufacturers accomplish the extra width differently. Some may cut more material for the upper part of the shoe. Some may cut the sole slightly wider. Some may only increase the width for every full size length change – or even every couple of size length changes. You never can be sure as the manufacturing processes can differ even for the same style.

Here are the terms used to measure shoe widths moving from the most narrow to the widest:

SS = AAAA = “extra slim” or “quad”, the narrowest size generally available. Even these widths are increasingly rare.

S = AAA= “slim” or “triple”

AA = N = “narrow” or “double A”

M = B = “medium”, the most common or “average” width for that size.

W = C or D = “wide”

WW = EE or EEE = “extra wide”

WWW = EEEE = “triple wide’. These widths are even more rare than the SS widths, although that may change as the rate of obesity increases. Obesity is only one of many factors that make for wider feet. And one can be obese but not have wider feet.

Remember you can always find more information how to measure your feet to find the perfect size by clicking here

On a different note I have been obsessing over boots. I seem to check out every pair I see. On the T, around town or at work. Boston women do where the cutest boots EVER! Here is a pair I am considering on buying. Let me know what you think?

Aerosoles Sarasota Blue Fabric at DesignerShoes.com

Sarasota by Aerosoles is a Low Heel Casual Boot

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